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Alfa Romeo 145 - 146 Forum > General > You & Your Car
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JeremyG
I got the latest acquisition back to my lair (or "forecourt", as it is becoming referred to by Mrs G) last week.

It's a '97 Phase 1 QV in black with a cloth interior on 89k miles with full history - but has been off the road for the last 8 years.

Condition is generally good all round, with decent bodywork and some rust on the floorpan (sills both sides need repairing; drain holes OK).

[attachment=17812:IMG_3324.jpg]

I'll post info here as I work through the car... but here's what I've done so far:

First challenge: bonnet won't open. Need to open bonnet to a) check there is an engine and b) get some power across the battery to close the windows - it had been stored with the windows slightly open (probably for the better)

Solution: jack up front of the car, place on stands, remove front wheels (and note that disks, pads, pipes, hoses, bushes and boots all look in reasonable nick). Get under car and realise undertray is still present (and almost intact)... luckily, there is still just enough room to force my right arm Inspector Gadget-style up behind the radiator to reach the bonnet release lever. It moves OK but the bonnet won't release. Eventually deploy teenage sons - one to pull release lever, the other to assist their father in yanking the bonnet upwards. Success comes at the second attempt - and even better, there is an engine under there... and no signs of rust on the suspension turrets. Apply grease to bonnet lock and test.

[attachment=17813:IMG_3329.jpg]

Second challenge: check the car will power up and close the windows

Solution: after 8 years, the battery is kaput, so I get some power across via jump leads from the 146 I've just sold. The alarm bleeps as the power is connected; and as I open the door the alarm goes off. I suppose that's good - but as the batteries in the key fobs are also dead I can't reset the alarm. Undeterred, I put the key in the ignition and switch on long enough to check the mileage is right, the CODE light goes out; the ECU lights turn on then off correctly; and the windows still work. With windows now closed I switch off, then disconnect the battery to shut the alarm off.

Replacing batteries in the key fobs (CR 2016 x2 in each fob) subsequently allows the alarm to be correctly engaged/disengaged, but the car battery is beyond salvation and is now awaiting recycling at the local tip.

Final check - there is oil (plenty) and water (not enough). Not going to try starting just yet, though...

Plan for this car (high level): work out if it is worth keeping, whilst spending as little money as possible

Plan for this car (slightly more detailed) - assess engine, electrics and drivetrain

Engine:

a) Remove aux belts and check alternator, power steering pump and aircon compressor will all still turn by hand

b) Remove timing belt cover and assess cam belt condition

c) If OK, remove engine top cover, coil packs and spark plugs

d) Attempt to rotate engine by hand - add lubricant to combustion chambers if required (small amount of engine oil? Plus Gas?)

e) If successful, connect battery from 146 and crank engine for compression test

f) If successful, add fresh fuel, clean and refit spark plugs and go for a start!

g) If successful, run engine up to temperature and check for leaks. Shut off then replace engine oil and filter. Top up coolant if required.

Electrics:

h) Check lights, indicators, horn, wipers, washers, blower etc. all work

Drivetrain:

i) Go for a quick drive around the block. Our roads are so bad that any suspension knocks will be immediately apparent...

Aiming to get all this done on Saturday morning... more news later...
dante giacosa
thats funny about the forecourt!

top marks for getting that bonnet open, Jeremy;
I'm afraid my brood are too young, and too deeply cynicised to assist in such a task.

Lucky those windows still work; its certainly good news that all the lights went out again; including the ABS indicator.
I think I'd want to know that the radiator fan still actuates; could be important!


However; in all other respects- I admire your shortlist for a Saturday morning!
Ganz
Definite drain the oil then flush it with some Diesel to get any s**t out. Replace with some cheap oil just to get the engine over by hand. Worth changing filter for that first start. Alternators can seize so get that turning without the belt on. Worth taking the cam cover off to look at the condition. They'll be sludge for sure. Worth cleaning that out with some cleaner or diesel on a rag. With hindsight I would empty he coolant and replace it. My engine was full of s**t after nearly four years of standing. Condensation plays its part. These engines are pretty resilient. All the best.
dante giacosa
on the subject of seized alternators

here's a question;

should I be able to turn an alternator over, by hand, with it off the car..?

I've got an issue on another vehicle (practically the exact alternator that is on the 146.gif ) and had an alternator in a box for a couple of years which was second hand, and dug it out this week to find it was SOLID

JeremyG
QUOTE(dante giacosa @ 20th April 2018 09:24) *
on the subject of seized alternators

here's a question;

should I be able to turn an alternator over, by hand, with it off the car..?

I've got an issue on another vehicle (practically the exact alternator that is on the 146.gif ) and had an alternator in a box for a couple of years which was second hand, and dug it out this week to find it was SOLID


Yes, you should be able to turn your alternator by hand. But as Ganz mentioned above, they do seem to seize up - on my Spider I had to replace it; on the 145 I'm hoping not to do so (more below).
JeremyG
As it was such a nice day today and work was kinda slow I decided to spend some time on the checklist above. Here's how I got on:

Engine:

a) Remove aux belt and check alternator, power steering pump and aircon compressor will all still turn by hand

- DONE: Belt removed; alternator stuck; power steering pump OK; aircon compressor not present (b**ger - it's a non-A/C car)

b) Remove timing belt cover and assess cam belt condition

- DONE: Timing belt looks OK and tensioner is a metal one supporting the service history

c) If OK, remove engine top cover, coil packs and spark plugs

- DONE: Plenty of oil in all of the plug wells... so plenty of lube in the combustion chambers when attempting to start, then. Some slight damage to one of the plug connectors but not fatal - and the frame holding the coil packs is missing one of its three mounting points.

d) Attempt to rotate engine by hand - add lubricant to combustion chambers if required (small amount of engine oil? Plus Gas?)

- DONE: engine rotates fine by hand with the plugs out

e) If successful, connect battery from 146 and crank engine for compression test

- NOT DONE (haven't got a compression tester yet)

f) If successful, add fresh fuel, clean and refit spark plugs and go for a start!

- DONE: partially successful; the engine turned over, coughed and ran for about 5 seconds burning all of the oil in the combustion chambers - lots of smoke. On retry would not run for more than a few seconds at a time. No errors on engine ECU. Air intake clear; throttle body cleaned. Still no joy. Therefore, suspect no fuel supply.

g) If successful, run engine up to temperature and check for leaks. Shut off then replace engine oil and filter. Top up coolant if required.

- NOT DONE

So... time to do some reading on best way to check and clean fuel system... (although I could cobble something temporary together to feed it fuel from the identical engine on my Spider as a test...)

Not a bad morning's work - provided that alternator can be persuaded to move. I don't fancy replacing that right now...
JeremyG
Removed coolant header tank for better access to cambelt cover:

[attachment=17814:IMG_3330.jpg]

Cambelt - cover is in two pieces (quite convenient, as it happens)

[attachment=17815:IMG_3344.jpg]

Coil packs out:

[attachment=17816:IMG_3347.jpg]

Damage to one connector:

[attachment=17817:IMG_3348.jpg]

Plug well dipstick:

[attachment=17818:IMG_3351.jpg]

The rest of the plugs...

[attachment=17819:IMG_3353.jpg]

The current brood (the 146 on the left is sold and leaving Monday)

[attachment=17820:IMG_3355.jpg]
dante giacosa
Good effort, Jeremy

How satisfying to get it to fire after four years.

And of course; that's the worst of it over; even though it didn't actually run for a period of time, the fact it turned over and blew off the cobwebs is the major hurdle over.

All downhill from here!

From what I can see of the shell and top-mounts from those pictures- it looks really solid...
JeremyG
QUOTE(dante giacosa @ 21st April 2018 00:30) *
Good effort, Jeremy

How satisfying to get it to fire after four years.

And of course; that's the worst of it over; even though it didn't actually run for a period of time, the fact it turned over and blew off the cobwebs is the major hurdle over.

All downhill from here!

From what I can see of the shell and top-mounts from those pictures- it looks really solid...


Thanks Jim! I'm pleased/relieved about the rust-free state of the engine bay - so far it just looks like the sills that will need repairing.

And obviously all of this takes way longer than you ever expect...
JeremyG
Investigated further the fuel supply issue today. Conclusion: pump is not running.

Started by disconnecting input line to the fuel rail and turning over the engine: no fuel was pumped

Then checked power to the pump: none; earth side OK (which means the inertial cutoff had not been activated).

Checked all of the relays leading to the pump (which was a familiar routine as I've recently done the same thing on my Spider) and discovered that the layout of the relays is not as per the manual. For those interested, the layout in the pic below is - from left to right - variator relay (S12c), main relay (S41), fuel pump relay (S12a).

[attachment=17821:IMG_3360.jpg]

(The manual has these as fuel pump, then variator, then main relay. I guess they could be installed in any order...)

All relays work correctly, however, and continuity of the downstream cabling to the pump was OK. Then I noticed a voltage at the pump immediately after turning on the ignition; and figured that the pump would not be running if the engine was not running. Sure enough, when turning the key to start, there is a voltage at the pump...

There is, however, still no sign of life from the pump itself, so I undid the knurled ring retaining the pump - but will probably leave it until tomorrow to get under the car and work out how to drop the tank. There's no way to remove the pump without doing this, given the access cover is in the wrong place...

[attachment=17822:IMG_3358.jpg]

Re. the alternator: I've turned the engine over (fruitlessly) many times now so I decided to refit the auxiliary belt to see if the alternator would budge under the starter motor: answer - YES!

So, making progress - but I really want to hear that motor running!

Anyone dropped their tank before? Any pointers?
JeremyG
Another resto question: what's the best way to remove the white corrosion from our alloy bits?

[attachment=17823:IMG_3365.jpg]

(I don't want to paint my engine cover; I just want it clean and original-looking).

Thoughts?
sanitary
QUOTE(JeremyG @ 21st April 2018 16:15) *
Another resto question: what's the best way to remove the white corrosion from our alloy bits?

[attachment=17823:IMG_3365.jpg]

(I don't want to paint my engine cover; I just want it clean and original-looking).

Thoughts?



wire brush in a dremel



aN
JeremyG
Removed the fuel pump assembly from the tank today (turns out it is just possible to do this without dropping the tank) and tested the pump - it's drawing current, but not pumping.

I stripped the unit down to get the pump out - it looks like an artefact from the Titanic...!

[attachment=17825:IMG_3369.jpg]

I tried hitting it with a mallet a few times but it still won't move - so, I'll be replacing it asap.

Baby steps...

... and to make up for the frustration of not being able to move forward, I polished the tailgate - came up nice!

[attachment=17826:IMG_3371.jpg]

Colour is 601 black - nothing fancy.
JeremyG
Well, I received my replacement Bosch fuel pump today, fitted it - and the car started straight off!

Fair bit of smoke (oil on the downpipe) and a tapping from the top of the engine (sticky cam follower?) but definitely a step in the right direction.

Need to check the coolant, lock down the pump assembly and go for a quick road test next. If the drivetrain is sound, she's a keeper!
alfizta
QUOTE(JeremyG @ 22nd April 2018 14:38) *
Removed the fuel pump assembly from the tank today (turns out it is just possible to do this without dropping the tank)


how you did that?
JeremyG
QUOTE(alfizta @ 25th April 2018 19:52) *
how you did that?


No magic, really - remove the inspection cover in the boot, disconnect cables x2, fuel hose x2 and breather hose. Use a mallet and large flat blade screwdriver to loosen the retaining ring and remove it. Then you can lift the pump assembly and carefully twist and rotate it up and out via the inspection hole. It only just fits, so prepare to be patient.
JeremyG
QUOTE(JeremyG @ 25th April 2018 16:35) *
Well, I received my replacement Bosch fuel pump today, fitted it - and the car started straight off!

Fair bit of smoke (oil on the downpipe) and a tapping from the top of the engine (sticky cam follower?) but definitely a step in the right direction.

Need to check the coolant, lock down the pump assembly and go for a quick road test next. If the drivetrain is sound, she's a keeper!


Had a bit more time this evening so I completed refitting the pump, checked for leaks, re-attached the inspection cover and replaced the boot carpet.

Then I started the engine and let it run up to temperature - the thermostat opened and the temperature gauge steadied at 80 degrees.

While this was happening, I checked all of the lights, wipers, washers, windows, heater etc etc - and amazingly everything seems to work OK. Although I did chicken out of trying the sunroof...

Finally, I checked I could engage and move off in all gears.

So, barring a quick test drive, that's my initial checklist complete. Good news!
dante giacosa
Well done, sir!


That's incredible-

what a success story.

I admire your methodical approach- I really felt like I was 'living' those steps with you!


My relays are out of sync on the mount too. I think it's consistently wrong, relative to the manual though. Giallo Evo did a post on it once. I really should label mine up for identification in a crisis...

That's funny about the fuel pump- if that is the ONLY unsalvagable thing from the original configuration; it's not a hardship!


what else could go wrong before a test drive? Brake fluid? Gearbox oil?


P.S. I personally would use a copper-bristle-(hand)brush on the engine cover initially; it might be less aggressive.
JeremyG
QUOTE(dante giacosa @ 25th April 2018 22:35) *
Well done, sir!
That's incredible - what a success story.


Thanks, Dante... well, I do love a list...

The pump was a direct replacement at £35 so I can't complain about that - although I'll need a new battery, too - I'd like to think the fact the car had been looked after by Alfa specialists most of its life has made a difference.

Long term I'll need to replace all fluids and filters, cambelt, aux belt, water pump, all tensioners and spark plugs - discs and pads actually look OK so I may get away without changing those. But until I drive it I won't know what state the suspension is in... that'll happen on Friday, I reckon.

Good call on the wire brush - or I might even try an over scourer. The plastic tops are easier - put them through the dishwasher!
dante giacosa
dishwasher! thats funny

the dishwasher in my house, is typing this response...


there are many flavours of wire brush- the copper bristled one is least aggressive I think...
JeremyG
Got the car out for a brief road test today - from home to Halfords (to pick up oil and new battery) to MoT test centre (to book a test for the Spider) then back home...

Temperatures were good; the heater works; gear change is great; and the suspension is amazingly free from any knocks and clonks.

It's not all good, though, as the front offside brake is binding, and the rear wiper isn't working.

I'm minded to fix these, do a quick oil and filter change then get the car MoT tested to see if anything else is needed apart from the welding.
dante giacosa
Unbelievable

You can spot the good 'uns, eh?!

They don't 'build 'em like they used to' and all that... (Seems like the right thing to say at this point!)


I bet; the rear wiper motor has seized, and taken the fuse with it...?
JeremyG
QUOTE(dante giacosa @ 27th April 2018 17:32) *
I bet; the rear wiper motor has seized, and taken the fuse with it...?


The rear wiper does indeed appear to be seized - I've removed the hatchback rear trim panel and checked power at the motor; I've removed the retaining bolts from the motor casing and the circlip from the spindle but the spindle seems stuck in the hatch. Am I missing something - or do I need to just use more force?

Also, the alarm system has been behaving weirdly, too - I've triggered it a few times because it is set to self-arm. Before I got round to changing the country code to stop the self-arming, the alarm has suddenly gone silent on me. It no longer beeps when the alarm is set/unset - and the siren doesn't work. But the system still responds to the remote key, the indicators flash, and the doors lock and unlock... weird... I'll post this in a separate thread, I think...

Finally, I stripped and lubricated the binding front caliper.
dante giacosa
Caliper sounds like fun- a job we have all got coming.

That's a weird one about the rear wiper motor not coming off. Short of there being a hidden locking nut on the outside of the car, spray some penetrating fluid on it and leave overnight.

I was going to suggest giving it a couple of oblique taps with a light hammer- but does it go through the glass itself on the 145?!

Maybe that's not such a Good idea!!
JeremyG
QUOTE(dante giacosa @ 29th April 2018 21:35) *
That's a weird one about the rear wiper motor not coming off. Short of there being a hidden locking nut on the outside of the car, spray some penetrating fluid on it and leave overnight.


There are no further screws or fixings - in the end, some side-to-side motion was all that was required to free the wiper spindle and washer jet assembly from its surround - itís just a push fit.

There are seemingly two issues with these units - rust on the spindle and grease on the copper brushes. Mine is suffering from both problems. Cleaning the grease from the copper contacts is easy. Sorting the rusted spindle is a little harder - despite the presence of an o-ring at the top, water has got past and the spindle has rusted inside its plastic sleeve. As the rust has developed it has distorted and split the sleeve, leaving it well and truly jammed.

Replacement units can be found on eBay so I decided to take a hacksaw to the sleeve to see if I could save my unit. With the sleeve removed, I rubbed down the spindle to get rid of the loose rust, then packed with grease and refitted the sleeve.

Now itís back together I just need to test it...
JeremyG
... and another thing... the new fuel pump is dead already... 😧

I was just about to go for a quick test drive having freed up the sticky front brake caliper - when the motor died. Again, fuel starvation. So I pulled the pump unit (getting to be a dab hand at this) and sure enough, the pump was jammed. Having carefully cleaned the pump assembly before refitting it with the new pump a few days ago, it was worrying to see the amount of gunk that had collected in the bottom of the pump assembly in less than an hourís running.

Iím assuming the pump ingested some rubbish and jammed - and therefore Iím going to have to drain the tank and clean out the rust particles from the disintegrating original pump... or else this will keep happening... grrr

To make matters worse, while I was cleaning the new gunk, the replacement pump rolled off the table onto the (stone) floor - and guess what? It landed head first, snapping the output spout clean off...

So, Iíve ordered another new pump. The irony was that, of course, the broken pump worked just fine when I tested it later - maybe the impact with the floor dislodged whatever had jammed it in the first place...?

(I guess I should just be grateful that the fuel blockage happened with the car still on the drive.)
dante giacosa
(good work on the wiper motor diagnosis)

Jeremy- I've got an idea on the fuel tank situation

Why don't you utilise the broken fuel-pump as a tank drainer..?

You wouldn't need the output spout as such. You could connect it to a 12v source, and run it, to drain the tank into a bucket (if it'll run)

Then remove it, and get you hands in there to scour out the crud. It might save having to remove the tank. Would the aperture be wide enough to get a hand in..?
JeremyG
Yes, I will be trying to empty the tank in situ - there's easily room to get my hand in via the hole for the pump.

But I fear the pump itself will not be up to the job - annoying!

[attachment=17855:IMG_3413.jpg]

Here's the debris in the bottom of the pump bucket - bearing in mind it was spotless when I refitted it last week:

[attachment=17856:IMG_3411.jpg] [attachment=17857:IMG_3412.jpg]
JeremyG
On a more positive note, the rear wiper now works fine!

The copper brushes were covered in grease:

[attachment=17858:IMG_3407.jpg]

I also removed all grease from the underside of the driven cog that the brushes make contact with:

[attachment=17859:IMG_3410.jpg]

And here is the spindle - rusty, showing the split in its containing tube (the split should just be a groove):

[attachment=17860:IMG_3404.jpg]

... and finally a build showing the spindle with the sleeve cut off and cleaned of surface rust; greased; and reassembled with the spindle, washer tube, washer and circlip in place plus some duct tape to hold the cut sleeve in place.

[attachment=17862:IMG_3422.jpg] [attachment=17861:IMG_3423.jpg] [attachment=17863:IMG_3427.jpg]

I think you can get a sense of the movement here - and don't worry, I've got a new wiper arm on order:

[attachment=17864:IMG_3430.jpg]

Next up: washers, front and back (pump's working, but no fluid delivered). And, of course, the fuel pump.
VROOM
I recently had the same pleasure of the seized wiper. I didn't take the spindle sleeve off, but sprayed WD40 into it over and over again until it eventually moved freely. I actually thought the grease was meant to be the cog face so smeared more on, but of course now that you mention it I realize how it can cause a problem. wacko.gif
Ganz
Good work. Have a look at my thread red devil. I dropped the petrool tank as you put it. Pointers.. you may have already done this. It's a straight forward job. Have a look at these pics if it's any help.

[attachment=17868:IMAG3647.jpg]

[attachment=17869:IMAG3648.jpg]

[attachment=17870:IMAG3649.jpg]
dante giacosa
can't believe you managed to fix the rear wiper...

Well done...

JeremyG
Today I decanted the fuel (approx. 2.5 litres), filtered it, and cleaned the bottom of the tank. All clear. A new fuel pump arrived on Friday so I cleaned the debris from the pump assembly, reassembled it with the new pump unit, and refitted it in the newly-cleaned tank.

I then poured the filtered fuel into the tank and turned the engine over.

It fired - but only just. And I struggled to get it to rev much above tickover - and only by gently increasing revs to around 3k, after which they'd drop back down towards tickover again. Feels like I'm not getting enough fuel pressure... so more investigation to do there.

What are your thoughts: blocked filter, or the wrong pump?

[Ganz: thanks for the pics, but as there was relatively little fuel in the tank, I decided just to scoop it out via the pump opening.]
JeremyG
On another note, I managed to remove the alarm unit from the boot. In doing so, I noticed that the siren casing protrudes through a hole in the rear panel of the car - behind the rear bumper.

The protruding siren casing has a set of holes. As I lifted it away from its mounting, a load of water drained out of the holes - and having shaken all of the water out, the siren worked again!

So, this will need waterproofing prior to refitting the siren unit. I think cling film will do the job...

[attachment=17909:IMG_3443.jpg]
JeremyG
I started tracing through the windscreen washer piping today. There is water in the reservoir and the washer pump runs - but no water makes it to the screen, front or rear. Headlamp washers work fine.

So far, I've traced the windscreen washer piping to a Y-joint at the back of the engine bay behind the black sponge triangle. The y-joint has a hole at its centre through which water is squirting - instead of sending it down the pipes to the jets on the scuttle panels. Very odd. More investigating to do tomorrow...
dante giacosa
Jeremy-

The Y-joint is a non-return-valve,which is a sort of miniature rubber membrane which only allows one way flow.

When they fail- They seem to just leak out of themselves.

It's a part which is very hard to buy a good one of, although Halfords do do one.

I think I may have replaced with a straight T-junction


Think I've got a picture of the alarm exterior part which you describe on the 146... (Before & after cleanup)
I also have a sort of air vent round the back of the car, with like a plastic 'sink strainer' over the hole.
I think the purpose is to allow a through-put of cabin-air for ventilation purposes.

JeremyG
QUOTE(dante giacosa @ 7th May 2018 08:26) *
Jeremy-

The Y-joint is a non-return-valve,which is a sort of miniature rubber membrane which only allows one way flow.

When they fail- They seem to just leak out of themselves.

It's a part which is very hard to buy a good one of, although Halfords do do one.

I think I may have replaced with a straight T-junction
Think I've got a picture of the alarm exterior part which you describe on the 146... (Before & after cleanup)
I also have a sort of air vent round the back of the car, with like a plastic 'sink strainer' over the hole.
I think the purpose is to allow a through-put of cabin-air for ventilation purposes.


Great, thanks - although it looks to me like the hole in the bodywork is there simply to let the sound out from the siren. There was a kind of silicone membrane over the holes in the siren unit which had disintegrated (and presumably that was how the water got in).

On the Y-piece - no point in attempting a repair, by the sound of things - so I'll go straight for a replacement!

In fact: just ordered one here:

http://www.ricambio.co.uk/75-alfa-romeo/19...fiat-alfa-romeo
dante giacosa
Oh!

So, you think BOTH holes are for the siren?

I've never had mine out, so I don't know 'exactly' how it interfaces with those parts.

(In the FIAT Coupť world- there is a silicone membrane 'vent' in exactly the same position, which does indeed have a cabin ventilation functionality- the alarm is under a front wing!


Separately- do YOU recognise THIS gas station??!!


JeremyG
Ha - yes, I do recognise that gas station - looks a lot like the BP station in Benson.

Were you down here recently???


QUOTE(dante giacosa @ 7th May 2018 09:04) *
Oh!

So, you think BOTH holes are for the siren?

I've never had mine out, so I don't know 'exactly' how it interfaces with those parts.

(In the FIAT Coupť world- there is a silicone membrane 'vent' in exactly the same position, which does indeed have a cabin ventilation functionality- the alarm is under a front wing!


Refitted the alarm unit having covered the siren with cling film to prevent the ingress of water. Works fine, for now...
dante giacosa
as it happens, I was round your 'manor, as they might have said on The Bill, yesterday, during my hilarious Bournemouth to Birmingham oddessy.

Fuel was required with 80 miles to go, and we happened to stop at Oxford.

I like to think somebody might have spotted the car and thought; "hmm- I recognise that!?"

But maybe not.

If I hadn't been with company, and had had more time, I might have been in touch to make a pest of myself on your 'forecourt'...

Back in Edinburgh now- 146.gif didn't miss a beat- despite an hour of stationary traffic on the M6 this afternoon.

(Sorry- I'm hijacking your thread)

All of this should be in brackets...
JeremyG
QUOTE(dante giacosa @ 7th May 2018 20:15) *
Back in Edinburgh now- 146.gif didn't miss a beat- despite an hour of stationary traffic on the M6 this afternoon.

(Sorry- I'm hijacking your thread)

All of this should be in brackets...

Hijack away - glad to see you're confident enough to drive the 146 from north to south and back again!

QUOTE(JeremyG @ 6th May 2018 23:46) *
It fired - but only just. And I struggled to get it to rev much above tickover - and only by gently increasing revs to around 3k, after which they'd drop back down towards tickover again. Feels like I'm not getting enough fuel pressure... so more investigation to do there.

What are your thoughts: blocked filter, or the wrong pump?


Fitted a new fuel filter this morning - but this has not improved things. The engine still won't rev above tickover. I'm not sure where to look next to fix this - any suggestions would be appreciated... (although one thought I had was to swap in the fuel rail from my Spider - to eliminate the injectors and fuel pressure regulator).

Posted the same question on Alfaowner here:

http://www.alfaowner.com/Forum/engines-ts-...ml#post17161745
JeremyG
QUOTE(JeremyG @ 7th May 2018 08:54) *
On the Y-piece - no point in attempting a repair, by the sound of things - so I'll go straight for a replacement!

In fact: just ordered one here:

http://www.ricambio.co.uk/75-alfa-romeo/19...fiat-alfa-romeo


Got two lovely new Y-pieces from the nice people at Ricambio International earlier in the week. Water is now reaching the screen jets - but alas, with neither the power nor volume that will be required to pass an MoT test.

Old cars are a pain, aren't they???

What do you reckon - search for blockages in the pipework/nozzles? Or just replace the pump?

(And frankly, I think the same choice applies for the fuel supply, too...)
dante giacosa
replace the pump Jeremy

There's no alternative- that's what I did with mine (/ours)- try for an original one from eBay...
Ganz
QUOTE(dante giacosa @ 7th May 2018 09:04) *
Oh!

So, you think BOTH holes are for the siren?

I've never had mine out, so I don't know 'exactly' how it interfaces with those parts.

(In the FIAT Coupť world- there is a silicone membrane 'vent' in exactly the same position, which does indeed have a cabin ventilation functionality- the alarm is under a front wing!


Separately- do YOU recognise THIS gas station??!!


Nice motor worshippy.gif

QUOTE(Ganz @ 13th May 2018 23:16) *
Nice motor worshippy.gif


Got the same problem with my water jets.. none existent. A pain driving into the a head on summer evening sun.
JeremyG
Yesterday I removed my washer and coolant header tanks for cleaning - the former because I discovered the filter on the washer pump was full of gunk; the latter because - well, why not do them both?

I'll reassemble the pumps into the washer tank before refitting - will save a few skinned knuckles that way, I reckon.

The new pump is extremely effective at pumping water from a beer glass, but is a third party unit with wider bore outlets - necessitating some replacement tubing. I'm keeping the original pipework so I can revert to original spec if needed... but that can wait until I get it through the MoT...

[attachment=17923:IMG_3450.jpg]
dante giacosa
was that from a beer glass into your mouth..?!! biggrin.gif



are there bleed holes in the block for coolant refilling..?
JeremyG
QUOTE(dante giacosa @ 14th May 2018 12:19) *
was that from a beer glass into your mouth..?!! biggrin.gif
are there bleed holes in the block for coolant refilling..?


Bleeding not required, I hope, as I've only lost the fluid in the header tank itself. The water level is still visible in the outlet pipe, just below the top.

No sign of any anti-freeze, though... good job it's summer...

dante giacosa
oh yes; I see what you mean-

so it's just a top-up afterwards, rather than a 'refill'...?
JeremyG
Yes, exactly. When I get round to a cambelt change I'll replace the water pump and the coolant.
JeremyG
The tanks cleaned up nicely so I refitted them today... I also discovered a patch of rust on the outside of the inner wing, adjacent to the washer bottle. It was a few square inches, so I treated it with Dinitrol RC900 and a coat of black Hamerite.

Washer bottle and pumps in:

[attachment=17926:IMG_3451.jpg]

Header tank:

[attachment=17927:IMG_3452.jpg]

And now, turbo-powered washer jets!:

[attachment=17928:IMG_3453.jpg]

So, another job done.

(And as it happens, I think what was stopping the washers from working was gunk on the intake filter. But a fresh pump can't do any harm.)

Unfortunately: no sign of output from the rear washer. Not quite sure how I'll find the blockage there: the weak point where the pipe passes the hinge and into the tailgate looks OK... but that's not an MoT fail, right?
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