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malfarati
post 10th January 2016 21:00
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Hi All,

Chatting to a mate today about my 1.8TS project and he came up with an idea that could make a lot of sense.

With the availability of replacement and spare parts becoming more and more difficult, he suggested I use the parts off a modern Alfa say a 147 or Mito and fit them to my 145, making replacement parts easier to source in the future.

The main plan was to substitute the suspension struts, wheel hubs, discs and calipers all round, and driveshafts (if they fit).

Anyone know if this is possible or not, or can suggest an alternative solution?

Thanks.

This post has been edited by malfarati: 10th January 2016 21:02
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langers
post 11th January 2016 08:00
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Fiat TIPO, Fiat Coupe, Alfa 145 146, FIAT Bravo Brava, I Believe that some 147 156 parts will also fit. All dependent on engine variation.


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'96 Purple 145 QV died from rust - '98 Blue Junior SOLD - '99 Red 145 QV 20VT SOLD - '97 145 QV Track Tart SOLD
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malfarati
post 11th January 2016 20:04
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QUOTE(langers @ 11th January 2016 08:00) *
Fiat TIPO, Fiat Coupe, Alfa 145 146, FIAT Bravo Brava, I Believe that some 147 156 parts will also fit. All dependent on engine variation.


Thanks for the reply. I haven't got a clue what engine mine has, the previous owner used the car as a donor for his 145 QV, what I do know is that it was a 1.8 twin spark, possibly a CF2 as it has a plastic top cover.

Wondering if it's worth sourcing a 156 with a rear end shunt and use the engine, gearbox, suspension, brakes, etc. from that instead?
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Cloverleaf76
post 12th January 2016 12:04
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QUOTE(malfarati @ 11th January 2016 20:04) *
Thanks for the reply. I haven't got a clue what engine mine has, the previous owner used the car as a donor for his 145 QV, what I do know is that it was a 1.8 twin spark, possibly a CF2 as it has a plastic top cover.

Wondering if it's worth sourcing a 156 with a rear end shunt and use the engine, gearbox, suspension, brakes, etc. from that instead?


Engine and box are to all intents and purposes the same. In fact there is marginal advantage to dressing the last TS engine (CF3) as CF2 (using the 145 sensors, electronics and ancils) because there is substantial weight reduction on the crank. AFAIK there is though no advantage in terms of more readily available parts. That said, do you actually have the ECU and looms? I'd say that rewiring from scratch with donor electronics from a 156 would be more trouble than it's worth.

Suspension etc would be harder due to the double wishbone design on the 147 & 156. You would need to check at the very least that the geometry would work and that eg the top mounts would go in the right place. This aspect might just be okay to judge by the success people have had with turbo / v6 conversions from sister Tipo II cars.

But TBH I can't see an advantage there in that consumable 145 suspension parts are pretty readily available (dampers and wishbones anyway. Top mounts can be found too if you know where to look) and 156 suspension is famously fragile and more expensive to replace: that extra wishbone adds labour and parts cost, while the ARB drop links are faintly ridiculous they are so slender and very prone to deforming under load. They need very regular replacement to preserve handling / feel.

You would also struggle for wheels as 156s had a 5x98 stud pattern and you would need to come up with some 15" wheels with that same pattern, or be prepared to get into spacers and flaring wheel arches to make 16s fit.

My guess is that it could all be done but it would be a massive PITA! You would be going to most of the trouble of a turbo / v6 conversion with none of the power gain...


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malfarati
post 12th January 2016 22:39
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Uuuuuuuuummmmmmm... I'll probably scrap that idea then!

Replacing all the rusted parts while they're available is the better option I reckon. Not sure if the current CF2 engine even runs, shame as it's only done 70,000, although it could prove to be more troublesome trying to find out whats missing than updating to a decent 1.8 CF3 unit instead.

Thanks for all your advice.
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langers
post 14th January 2016 21:51
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Best thing to do provided that the chasis and body is good..... get a Fiat Coupe 16vt or 20vt... donor car, transfer over the loom, ECU, engine, gearbox, subframes etc. Done.


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'96 Purple 145 QV died from rust - '98 Blue Junior SOLD - '99 Red 145 QV 20VT SOLD - '97 145 QV Track Tart SOLD
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GialloEvo94
post 20th January 2016 01:01
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I would be inclined to steer clear of a CF3 engine. While the crankshaft on a CF3 may be lighter than a CF2 they reportedly suffer from greater wear problems than the CF2 engine does. I have purposely avoided a replacement CF3 engine for mine because of this very reason. The problem is that most of the donor TS engines that do come up for sale nowadays seem to be the CF3 variant. The cars that had the CF2 engine are so old now that most of them have long been scrapped complete with the engine unfortunately, so the CF2 engines now seem to be quite a rare find.

Both the CF2 and CF3 engines have the plastic cover on but the easiest way to tell the difference between a CF2 and CF3 is by the throttle body housing (assuming it is still fitted to the engine). The CF2 engine has a cable operated TB and the CF3 engine has an electronic "fly-by-wire" operated TB.


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malfarati
post 20th January 2016 21:21
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QUOTE(GialloEvo94 @ 20th January 2016 01:01) *
I would be inclined to steer clear of a CF3 engine. While the crankshaft on a CF3 may be lighter than a CF2 they reportedly suffer from greater wear problems than the CF2 engine does. I have purposely avoided a replacement CF3 engine for mine because of this very reason. The problem is that most of the donor TS engines that do come up for sale nowadays seem to be the CF3 variant. The cars that had the CF2 engine are so old now that most of them have long been scrapped complete with the engine unfortunately, so the CF2 engines now seem to be quite a rare find.

Both the CF2 and CF3 engines have the plastic cover on but the easiest way to tell the difference between a CF2 and CF3 is by the throttle body housing (assuming it is still fitted to the engine). The CF2 engine has a cable operated TB and the CF3 engine has an electronic "fly-by-wire" operated TB.


Some great advice there, thanks. I've decided to keep as many of the existing parts as possible and replace/update as when needed, this is also mainly for financial reasons too.

There is another point I need to think about, a decision between a respray costing about 2k, or to go for a wrap? Any ideas anyone?
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effkay
post 21st January 2016 13:44
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Spaying it yourself with plastidip could be a cheaper option:

https://www.youtube.com/user/DipYourCarcom
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