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> Testing kit for electrics...
JeremyG
post 3rd March 2019 12:13
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Every time I do any electrical testing, I keep thinking I need some better kit... all I have is a multimeter, a voltage testing screwdriver (with a bulb in it) and various lengths of wire... but this never seems enough to make reliable connections to the myriad of different connectors used on our cars.

Here's what I've got...

Attached Image


I guess I'm hoping there's some sort of kit out there with various adapters and the like to make testing easier - any thoughts?
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dante giacosa
post 3rd March 2019 20:01
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no, I think that's essentially as good as it gets, Jeremy.

I've got a Fluke 85 multimeter, which is about 15 years old now, and essentially a dinosaur, but still up to spec with modern slightly smaller gear. I think it was a couple of hundred quid (back in the day)- decent multimeters start at about 70.

I've only ever seen very few dedicated automotive wiring trinkets- one I DID see was an open-ended blade fuse carrier- which plugs in, like a conventional fuse- but allows you to enter the probes of your multimeter for inline current-measurement: if your 'meter will do that.

Good probes are the best thing (on the end of your test-set)

Occasionally, you can be a bit naughty and slice sideways into a cable to take a voltage reference from the actual blade of your knife - save having to cut the insulation off- but you have to be quite confident about the expected strain-radius of the wiring afterwards.

I have never seen a use for croc-clips; other than for the ABS self-diagnosis trick on the FIAT.

(Is that screwdriver really for 12v use?)

This post has been edited by dante giacosa: 3rd March 2019 20:04
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buellboy
post 4th March 2019 08:50
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QUOTE(dante giacosa @ 3rd March 2019 21:01) *
no, I think that's essentially as good as it gets, Jeremy.

I've got a Fluke 85 multimeter, which is about 15 years old now, and essentially a dinosaur, but still up to spec with modern slightly smaller gear. I think it was a couple of hundred quid (back in the day)- decent multimeters start at about 70.

I've only ever seen very few dedicated automotive wiring trinkets- one I DID see was an open-ended blade fuse carrier- which plugs in, like a conventional fuse- but allows you to enter the probes of your multimeter for inline current-measurement: if your 'meter will do that.

Good probes are the best thing (on the end of your test-set)

Occasionally, you can be a bit naughty and slice sideways into a cable to take a voltage reference from the actual blade of your knife - save having to cut the insulation off- but you have to be quite confident about the expected strain-radius of the wiring afterwards.

I have never seen a use for croc-clips; other than for the ABS self-diagnosis trick on the FIAT.

(Is that screwdriver really for 12v use?)

nice write-up


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donutty
post 4th March 2019 13:33
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My dad has one of these:

https://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B0714PHHJ9/ref=...1_t1_B071LHLSBB

It was very useful in diagnosing the cam sensor as you could see the 'high' pulses of the cycle on the oscilloscope type screen.

It's basically what you have in your picture all combined, plus a 'graphical signal indicator' (I can't really call it a true oscilloscope)
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dante giacosa
post 4th March 2019 14:26
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oh yeah?!

You could certainly diagnose the pulsed signals from a cam-sensor on impedance-measurement on an 'ordinary' 'meter- but it would be tricky whilst the car was running.

That however; is obviously the real-thing...
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Desperado
post 4th March 2019 17:03
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QUOTE(donutty @ 4th March 2019 13:33) *
My dad has one of these:

https://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B0714PHHJ9/ref=...1_t1_B071LHLSBB

It was very useful in diagnosing the cam sensor as you could see the 'high' pulses of the cycle on the oscilloscope type screen.

It's basically what you have in your picture all combined, plus a 'graphical signal indicator' (I can't really call it a true oscilloscope)


This is what I use now, still have a multimeter, 'scope and a power supply for bench testing but taking all that out to the car is a pain. The probe can do all of that much quicker, a bit less accurate but being able to put 12v on fuel pumps, relays and bulbs etc is much easier.


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JeremyG
post 4th March 2019 23:29
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Thanks for the advice, guys - the probe looks good. Presumably these connect to the battery, and allow voltage/current/resistance measurements, probing for 12V/earths etc.?

And yes, the screwdriver is for 12V use!

This post has been edited by JeremyG: 6th March 2019 10:26
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JeremyG
post 6th March 2019 10:29
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And what about this:

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Multimeter-Electro...3NME09V20KXXY6J
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dante giacosa
post 7th March 2019 09:44
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Er, 'wow!' I think!

gosh- could you ever need so many different types!

I suppose you'll be sorted for every eventuality- if they fit your multimeter...
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